150 Canadian Facts-150 Years-It’s All About Canada, eh?

Posted by on Jun 29, 2017 in Frugal For Everyone | 31 comments

Canada, eh?150 Canadian Facts is my contribution to Canada’s 150th Birthday. Hope you enjoy learning about our beautiful Country. We’re not always the polite and quiet folk people think we are – we do have our quirks. There are interesting – and sometimes odd – places to visit and things to do. But read on – discover for yourself the diversity of this land I am fortunate enough to call home. Happy Birthday, Canada.

  1. Canada became a country on July 1, 1867.
  2. Queen Elizabeth II is the Canadian Head of State.
  3. The Governor-General is the Queen’s representative in Canada.
  4. John A. MacDonald was Canada’s first Prime Minister.
  5. Canada’s name originated from an Iroquoian language word ‘Kanata’ meaning village.
  6. Canada’s capital is Ottawa, until recently the second coldest capital in the world with temperatures dipping down to -38C (-38F). It has now slipped down to fifth place but the temperature hasn’t improved – it’s still darn cold.
  7. Canada’s official phone number is 1-800-0-CANADA
  8. The North American Beaver is Canada’s national animal.
  9. Canada does not have a national flower – instead the Maple Leaf is the National emblem.
  10. Canada’s motto is A Mari Usque Ad Mare meaning From Sea to Sea.
  11. Canada’s national anthem ‘Oh Canada’ was written by Robert Stanley Weir in 1927 and officially adopted as Canada’s national anthem in 1980.
  12. Canada’s flag was officially adopted on February 15, 1965 – 98 years after Confederation. Upon seeing it, Queen Elizabeth II remarked that “a touch of blue would have been nice”………I agree.
  13. Canada has 10 Provinces and 3 Territories.
  14. CANADA/USA, AMIABLE NEIGHBOURS, MOSTLY. The Canada/USA border is the longest international border in the world, 8,891 km (5,525 miles) long. For years we took great pride in our ‘undefended border’. While there are many parts still unprotected since 9/11 passports are needed to cross at border crossings.
  15. This unprotected border has raised some interesting situations. The Haskell Free Library and Opera House straddles the border and has its entrance in Derby Line, Vermont, USA while the books are in Stanstead, Quebec, Canada. The building also contains an Opera House, where the audience sits in the USA while the stage is in Canada. The building has two addresses: 93 Caswell Avenue, Derby Line, Vermont, and 1 rue Church, Stanstead, Quebec. Both Canada and the USA declared the building a Heritage Site in the 1970s.
  16. The Aroostook Valley Country Club also straddles the Canada-USA border. Flying both flags, it is situated on the border at Perth-Andover, New Brunswick and Fort Fairfield, Maine. The course and clubhouse are on the Canadian side; the parking lot and pro shop are on the American side. With this course you can not only shoot the ball out of bounds, you can actually shoot it out of the country. Membership is about 50% from each country.
  17. Niagara Falls is a huge tourist attraction shared by Canada and the USA.
  18. 4 out of 5 of the Great Lakes are shared by Canada and the USA – Lake Superior, Lake Huron, Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. Lake Michigan is situated entirely within the USA.
  19. Canadians like the border – almost 75% live within a hundred miles (160km) of the border.
  20. It is estimated that 93,000 Canadians live in the USA with expired visas – more than any other group of immigrants.
  21. Canada celebrates Thanksgiving on the second Monday in October – much earlier than the Americans who celebrate on the fourth Thursday of November.
  22. Americans make fun of our monopoly coloured money so how’s this for irony? The green colour Americans use in their bills was invented by T. S. Hunt at Montreal’s McGill University in 1857.
  23. The USA has attacked Canada two times – in 1775 and 1812. No Wins – 2 Losses.
  24. In 1942, after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour, Canada declared war on Japan before the US did.
  25. Article 13 in the 1781 US Articles of Confederation states that if Canada wants to be admitted into the USA it will automatically be accepted. Sorry folks, can’t see this happening any time soon.
  26. CANADA NICE. Some Police Departments in Canada give out positive tickets. If they come across a young person doing something kind or positive, they will hand them a positive ticket. This promotes better interaction between the police and youth. Let’s hear it for our Canadian Cops – Yeah 🙂
  27. Residents of Churchill, Manitoba leave their car doors unlocked just in case a pedestrian needs a safe place to escape to from Polar Bears.
  28. Every Christmas 1 million letters are addressed to Santa Claus at his own postal code H0H 0H0, North Pole, Canada. These are all answered by Post Office volunteers. BTW – since the North Pole has a Canadian postal code and we all know Santa lives there, that makes Santa a Canadian – case closed.
  29. Since the 1930s, Canada and Denmark have been fighting (hic) over Hans Island which falls within the territorial waters separating Canada and Greenland (a territory of Denmark). In 1984 Canadian troops visited the Island, planted Canada’s flag and left a bottle of Canadian whiskey. The Danes retaliated. They removed the Canadian flag, planted the Danish flag, scooped up the whiskey and left a bottle of Schnapps along with a note “Welcome to the Danish Island”. The countries have tried to come to some resolution but it is believed that not too much effort has been put forth – after all, who wants to lose out on those lovely bottles. What a terrific way to disagree. Maybe they could give seminars at the UN.
  30. Canada and the USA have a service called ‘Cleaning for a Reason’. Volunteers go and clean the houses of women who have cancer so they can concentrate on beating their illness, rather than the state of their house.
  31. On 9/ll when America shut down its air space, flights were diverted to Canadian Airports, including Gander, Newfoundland which let 38 wide body planes carrying approximately 7,000 passengers land. Gander has a population of around 10,000 but the residents of Gander rallied round and housed, fed and sheltered the 7,000 passengers for three days. Other cities in Canada with airports followed suit and all together more than 33, 000 people were provided for.
  32. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina 1,000 personnel from the Canadian Forces and Canadian Coast Guard joined their American counterparts in relief efforts. Canada deployed a task force of three warships, a Coast Guard vessel, three Sea King helicopters, one BO-105 helicopter, several Griffon helicopters, along with their crews plus 35 divers. The ships and aircraft helped with search and rescue efforts, relocated people, delivered a huge amount of supplies: water containers, tents, cots, sunscreen, insect repellent and more. The divers helped to clear navigational hazards, including sunken vessels and debris and to inspect flood-damaged levees.
  33. During WWII, Canadians gave out buttons to people who tried to enlist but were rejected for medical reasons, showing their willingness to fight.
  34. Random Acts of Kindness is alive and well in Canada. Recently a friend and I went for coffee and when it was time to pay discovered someone had paid for us. Now looking to pass it on.
  35. CANADA SMART AND CLEVER. Canada has the highest literacy rate in the world with 99% literacy; more than 50% of Canadians have college degrees.
  36. Developed by Canadian Scientists, Canadarm, a Shuttle Remote Manipulator System is a robotic arm used to repair, capture, and deploy satellites; position astronauts, maintain equipment and move cargo. It was first launched into space in 1981 and had a final mission in July 2011.
  37. Canadarm 2 – an improved robotic arm with more maneuverability than its predecessor – was installed on the International Space Station in 2001.
  38. Though there has been some argument as to where exactly the telephone was invented, according to the inventor himself, Alexander Graham Bell, the telephone originated in Brantford, Ontario and the first transmission to a distance was between Brantford and Paris.
  39. Another invention that caused dispute was the invention of basketball. It originated in Springfield, Massachusetts but the inventor was James Naismith, a Canadian phys-ed teacher. We may not be joining the USA but it does seem that it’s hard to keep us separated. We like each other.
  40. Jacques Plante, a goalie for the Montreal Canadians was cut in a playoff game, received stitches and came back to play. A fan, Mr. Burchmore, who worked for Fiberglass Canada in Montreal approached Mr. Plante who agreed to sit while a mould of plaster of Paris was made of his face. Mr. Burchmore took the mould and turned it into a fibreglass mask with attached straps. The rest as they say is history.
  41. Canadian physician Frederick Banting and medical student Charles H. Best discovered the hormone insulin. By the end of 1921, with the help of Canadian chemist James B. Collip and Scottish physiologist J. R. MacLeod, Banting and Best purified insulin which has since successfully treated patients suffering from severe diabetes.
  42. The Blackberry was developed by Mike Lazaridis and Doug Fregin at Research In Motion in Waterloo, Ontario.
  43. Joseph-Armand Bombardier invented the snowmobile in Quebec. Besides being fun, or so I’m told, this machine has practical use. It has replaced the dog sled for people living in Canada’s far North. In our area of Ontario plus many other places, the snowmobile has been used by Emergency Services during winter snow storms when roads were closed.
  44. CANADA’S PLACES TO VISIT. Canada has: 42 National Parks; 167 National Historic Sites; 4 Marine Conservation Areas, and 15 World Heritage Sites. A number of the National Parks are bigger than some countries.
  45. Canada has a walled city in Quebec. It was the first city in North America to be placed on UNESCO’s World Heritage Sites list. Parks Canada personnel give guided tours and explain the city’s defense history. A unique and interesting place to visit.
  46. Hotel de Glace, Quebec City is an Ice Hotel – open from early January to late March. This hotel has 44 suites, huge snow vaults and magnificent ice sculptures. Something different for sure.
  47. Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto is the largest museum in Canada and has a huge collection of art, world culture and natural history. It attracts more than one million visitors every year and has many special events geared to children.
  48. Alpine Rafting in British Columbia is a place open to the adventurous person and the not so adventurous family groups. It is a premiere destination for Whitewater Rafting, Gentle Family Rafting & Stand Up Paddle boarding in the Canadian Rockies.
  49. The Northern Lights are a breathtaking natural phenomenon that literally light up the skies with glorious moving colours. The best opportunity to see them in Canada is from August to April although exactly when the lights will happen is hard to determine. Some of the best places to see the lights are:. Yellowknife, Northwest Territories; Iqaluit, Nunavut; Northern Labrador and Newfoundland; Churchill, Manitoba; Athabasca Country, Alberta; Canadian Rockies in Alberta and British Columbia.
  50. The Norstead Viking Village, a UNESCO World Heritage Viking Site has been identified as one Canada’s top ten ‘Hidden Travel Gems’. It’s located about two km from L’Anse aux Meadows and is the only authenticated Viking site in North America.
  51. ODD THINGS TO DO IN CANADA. Watson Lake, the Gateway to the Yukon, is home to a forest that has 72,000 signposts. In 1942 an American G.I. posted a sign showing the mileage to his hometown. This has become a tradition and anyone traveling to the Yukon via this route can leave his/her sign.
  52. Nanaimo, B.C. sponsors an annual bathtub race preceded by a bathtub parade. Converted bathtubs race over a 90-minute course.
  53. Garter Snake Capital of the World – Narcisse Snake Dens, north of Winnipeg, has viewing platforms where you can see thousands of garter snakes slithering from their dens.  This event takes place in Spring when the snakes first emerge from their dens before going into their mating ritual.
  54. Drink a Sour Toe Cocktail at The Downtown Hotel Bar in Dawson, Yukon. This is a drink made with bourbon and a pickled severed toe. The slogan to go with it: Drink it fast, Drink it slow, But drink it all and kiss the toe. 66,000 brave souls have participated so far.
  55. Float on the Dead Sea of Canada. Little Manitou Lake in Saskatchewan is so salty that you are able to read while floating along. No water wings required.
  56. Jump into a pumpkin and join the water race in Windsor, Nova Scotia. This fun event takes place annually in October. Huge gourds of all kinds are eligible.
  57. CANADA WEIRD. With all the great Canadian talent we have, guess who’s going to be headlining Canada’s one hundred fiftieth Birthday Bash in Ottawa – U2, an Irish Group. Am I the only one who thinks that’s weird?
  58. Canada was the first country to build a UFO landing pad in St. Paul, Alberta. Even the Minister of National Defence participated in the grand opening in 1967.
  59. Scotland has the Loch Ness monster – Canada has Ogopogo (half fish/half elk), a sea creature that has been spotted since the nineteenth century near Rattlesnake Island, British Columbia.
  60. In Canada it is a criminal offense to carry pepper spray or bear spray for personal protection. These products are considered weapons and therefore illegal.
  61. Prostitution is legal in Canada – buying the services of a prostitute is not. Figure that one out.
  62. Canada has a secret (?) underground laboratory built in a mine to avoid interference from environmental and solar radioactivity. Situated near Sudbury, Ontario, SNOLAB studies neutrino and dark matter .
  63. Icebergs aren’t just useless hunks of ice. In Spring, when the icebergs arrive from Greenland to the Coast of Newfoundland and Labrador they are actually harvested to make wine, beer, vodka and skin care products.
  64. There is a town in Quebec called Saint Louis-du-Ha!Ha! And of all things it started as a Catholic Mission.
  65. Sober Island, Nova Scotia has a dispute going on with a brewery as to whether or not it will allow the brewery on the Island. Since the beer made by this brewery uses oysters, and Sober Island has lots of them, it would make sense to partner but to date no agreement has been reached. Don’t you think it would be neat to have a beer with the label ‘made on Sober Island’?
  66. CANADA TALENT. Painters: Emily Carr, Tom Thomson, The Group of Seven, Margaret Pratt  – there are many more, too numerous to list.
  67. Musicians: Neil Young, Bryan Adams, Shania Twain, Leonard Cohen, Joni Mitchell, Celine Dion, Michael Buble, Oscar Peterson, Paul Anka, Anne Murray, Randy Bachman, Drake and many, many more.
  68. Authors: Margaret Atwood, Mordecai Richler, Alice Munro, Lucy Maud Montgomery, Margaret Laurence, Stephen Leacock, Farley Mowatt, and many more.
  69. Dancers: Anh Nguyen, Blake McGrath, Veronica Tennant, Lynn Seymour, Georgia Simms, Karen Kain, more.
  70. Athletes: Mike Weir, Nancy Greene, Ferguson Jenkins, Clara Hughes, Wayne Gretzky, more.
  71. Actors: Jim Carrey, Ryan Gosling, Michael J. Fox, Dan Ackroyd, Keanu Reeves, William Shatner, Christopher Plummer, Ellen Page, Pamela Anderson, more.
  72. Most Famous Canadian who made a difference: Terry Fox – A cancer victim who lost his leg, Terry wanted to run across Canada to raise awareness and funds for cancer research. His journey came to an abrupt end in Sept/80 in Sudbury, Ontario when he became to ill to carry on. He passed away June/81. His memory carries on and every year since then Terry Fox runs around the world continue to raise money (about $600million to date) for cancer research. Who says one person can’t make a difference?
  73. Michael J Fox, a well-known Canadian-American Actor, was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease at age 29 and informed the public about his condition in 1998. When the symptoms of his disease worsened he retired from acting. He works tirelessly toward finding a cure for the disease. He created the Michael J. Fox Foundation which to date has raised more than 700 million for research and treatment of Parkinson’s.  Sweden’s Karolinska Institutet gave him a honoiris causa doctorate for his aggressive approach to finding a cure.
  74. CANADA SPORTS: Hockey is Canada’s National Winter Sport; Lacrosse is Canada’s National Summer Sport. Keeping both groups happy is such a Canadian thing to do, eh?
  75. The Canadian NHL Teams are: Montreal Canadiens, Toronto Maple Leafs, Ottawa Senators, Winnipeg Jets, Edmonton Oilers, Calgary Flames; Vancouver Canucks.
  76. The Blue Jays are Canada’s Baseball Team. The Montreal Expos abdicated to the USA. Go Jays Go!!
  77. The Canadian Football League has 9 teams: BC Lions, Calgary Stampeders, Edmonton Eskimos, Winnipeg Blue Bombers, Saskatchewan Roughriders, Hamilton Tiger-Cats, Ottawa RedBlacks, Montreal Alouettes,  Toronto Argonauts,
  78. National Lacrosse Teams are: Calgary Roughnecks, Saskatchewan Rush, Toronto Rock, Vancouver Stealth.
  79. Canada’s Basketball League has 8 teams: Windsor Express, London Lightning, Mississauga Power, Brampton A’s, St. John Mill Rats, Moncton Miracles, Island Storm, Halifax Rainmen. We also have the Raptors, the only Canadian based team in the NBA.
  80. Canada has hosted the Olympic Games three times: Montreal 1976, Calgary 1988, Vancouver, 2010.
  81. In Vancouver 2010 Canada set a record for the most gold medals won by a country in a winter Olympics and also the most gold medals won by a host country in the winter Olympics.
  82. CANADIAN FOOD. Canada has the most donut shops per capita of any country in the world; Canadians also eat the most donuts. Tim’s is where it’s at.
  83. The Hawaiian pizza was created by an Ontario man.
  84. Peameal Back Bacon originated in Canada. It is made from lean boneless pork loin, fat trimmed off, cured in a brine and finally rolled in cornmeal.
  85. Poutine is a French-Canadian dish made up of French fries, cheese curd and gravy. Messy but good (not exactly the dish for cholesterol conscious folk).
  86. Cheddar is the most popular selling cheese in the world. Canada produces an amazing variety of them – mild, medium, old cheddar; clothbound cheddar; aged cheddar 2-4 years; cheddar curds; cheddar with horseradish; semi-soft cheddar and many, many more.
  87. Maple Syrup is a Canadian favourite and Canada produces 85% of the world’s supply. The “Global Strategic Maple Syrup Reserve” is in Quebec. This is a multiyear inventory of what is believed to be the single biggest stash of maple syrup in the world. This was set up to ensure a constant supply and to keep prices stable.
  88. Beaver Tails are made by hand-stretching pastry into beaver tails, deep frying it, then topping it with whipped cream and berries. This is a must treat for anyone visiting Ottawa.
  89. Butter Tarts are a Canadian treat. They’re crumbly shortbread type pastry made with butter, syrup, sugar and eggs – raisins or pecans optional.
  90. Nanaimo Bars were created in British Columbia but quickly caught on in the rest of Canada. A wonderful treat made from a wafer crumb base, custard centre and chocolate top.
  91. Figgy duff is a Newfoundland boiled pudding made in part with sugar, molasses and raisins and often with cognac and rum. It is more like a cake than a pudding and at Christmas more booze (Newfie Screech 40% alcohol?) can be poured over the top of it and lit on fire. Want to spend a happy Christmas in Newfoundland?
  92. Ice wine is made from grapes that have frozen on the vine which makes for a lovely sweet wine, usually considered a dessert wine. Expensive but yummy.
  93. Moosehead Breweries is Canada’s oldest privately owned brewery since 1867. It is owned and operated by the Oland family in Saint John New Brunswick. This brewery is a real going concern – it turns out 1640 bottles of beer a minute.
  94. CANADIAN WILDLIFE: Canada protects its’ wildlife. There are 38 highways and roads in Canada that have under/overpasses strictly for wildlife use. While cars use the roads, the grizzlies, black bear, moose, cougars, bighorn sheep, etc. are able to cross on their own special built under/overpasses ensuring safe crossing.
  95. Wood Buffalo National Park, on the border of Northern Alberta and Southern Northwest Territories, is home to the world’s largest herd of roaming Wood Bison and to the last known nesting site of whooping cranes. The wood bison is the largest land animal in Canada
  96. Blue Whales are the largest sea animal in the world. They can often be found along the coast of Canada.
  97. There are five deer species in Canada – white-tailed deer, mule deer, caribou, elk and moose. Both the elk and moose are pretty scary to encounter – the elk with its very loud bugling sound and the moose because it is unpredictable and can be quite aggressive, especially during mating season. The white-tailed deer believe our backyard is their personal grazing ground.
  98. There are three species of bear in Canada – black bear, polar bear and grizzly. Black bears are plentiful and they have been seen in large cities and locally (Grey-Bruce area of Ontario) checking out bird feeders and even in trees trying to get to bird feeders.  60% of the world’s polar bears (16,000 of them) call Canada home. 15,000 Grizzlies roam the Canadian North and are considered an endangered species.
  99. Canada has three species of wildcats – the bobcat, lynx and cougar.  While these animals have no business living in Southern Ontario or close to cities, they are nonetheless quite often spotted in these locations.
  100. There are over 600 different species of birds in Canada unfortunately many in serious decline. The Canada Goose is the largest migratory bird with a wing span of 1.7 metres (68 inches) while the calliope hummingbird, measuring only 7.6 cm (3 inches) long is the smallest bird in Canada.
  101. CANADIAN HISTORY/GEOGRAPHY AND OTHER FACTS: Canada is the second largest country in the world, behind Russia and just ahead of the USA.
  102. To travel from coast to coast in Canada you go through six time zones. Talk about jet lag.
  103. Canada has the third largest oil reserves of any country in the world after Saudi Arabia and Venezuela.
  104. Canada has the largest coastline in the world, 243,042 km. on three oceans – Pacific, Arctic, Atlantic.
  105. The Trans-Canada highway is the longest highway in the world – more than 7,600 km in length (4,700 miles).
  106. Large parts of Canada have less gravity than the rest of the Earth.
  107. Canada has had no weapons of mass destruction since 1984. It has signed treaties renouncing their ownership.
  108. Canada was the third country in space after the USA and Russia.
  109. In 1962, Canada was thought to have the most advanced space program.
  110. Canada no longer has 1 and 2 dollar bills. These have been replaced by coin – the $1.00 loonie and the $2.00 toonie.
  111. Canada no longer uses pennies – one cent pieces. Merchants take cash payments to the nearest 5 cents – for instance for a bill of $85.23 you could pay either $85.20 or $85.25, depending on store policy.
  112. Canada has a $1,000,000 coin made of .9999999% pure gold, it has a maple leaf on the front, is the size of an extra large pizza, weighs 100 kg (220.5 pounds). It is actually negotiable – the only possible use I can think of is buying that top of the line Maserati.
  113. In Canada, Mexico, India, Russia and Israel, bank notes have braille-like markings making it possible for the blind to identify the bills.
  114. In 2015 Canada’s population numbered 35.85 million compared to Russia, 144.1 million and the USA 324.1 million.
  115. Canada’s population is smaller than the metropolitan area of Tokyo – Yokohama which has a population of 37.84 million.
  116. 1 out of 5 Canadians are foreign born – this is the highest number of any G8 country.
  117. Canadians have more than 200 different type of languages as their mother tongue.
  118. 81% of Canadians live in cities.
  119. 3 out of 5 Canadians live in Ontario and Quebec.
  120. There are more Canadians over 65 than under 15 years of age. In 2016 there were 5.9 million people aged 65 and older compared to 5.8 million children under 15.
  121. The average life expectancy is 82 years.
  122. Nunavut is the largest and northernmost Territory of Canada, representing 20% of Canada’s total land area – it covers 1,936,000 sq.km of land and 157,000 sq.km. of water.
  123. Alert, Nunavut, population 62, is the northernmost permanently inhabited place in the world, only 817 km from the North Pole.
  124. Canada’s highest mountain is Mount Logan in the Yukon Territories at 5,959m (19,551 feet).
  125. Canada’s Baffin, Ellesmere and Victoria Islands are all listed among the top ten largest islands in the world.
  126. The Athabasca Sand Dunes in Saskatchewan are the most northerly sand dunes in the world. They measure 30 m (98 feet) high.
  127. There are more lakes in Canada than in the rest of the world combined. Almost 9% of Canada’s total area is covered by freshwater.
  128. Ontario, Canada has more than 250,000 lakes which combined contain about 20% of the world’s fresh water.
  129. Lake Huron is the second largest of the Great Lakes – It contains Manitoulin Island, the world’s largest freshwater Island.
  130. Great Bear Lake is the largest lake within Canada and the fourth largest in North America. This lake is covered with ice from late November to July; during most of that time it is used as an ice road.
  131. Great Slave Lake is the deepest lake in North America.
  132. Wasaga Beach, Ontario is the longest freshwater beach in the world.
  133. The highest waterfall in Canada is Della Falls, British Columbia, which has a total vertical drop of 440m (1444 feet)
  134. The Bay of Fundy, New Brunswick has the highest tides in the world and 15 species of whales.
  135. The Nakwakto Rapids which flow through the Slingsby Channel in British Columbia, have the strongest currents in the world at speeds of more than 18km per hour.
  136. Canada has trees and lots of them. About 40% of Canada is covered by forest. Canada owns 10% of the world’s forests and about 30% of the world’s boreal forests.
  137. CANADA CAN BE COLD – lowest temperature was recorded in Snag, Yukon in 1947 – a chilly -81.4 degrees Fahrenheit (-63 degrees Celcius).
  138. It can get cold enough in Newfoundland to freeze part of the Atlantic. Rather than complain residents go out to play hockey on the frozen surface. That’s so Canadian eh?
  139. The town of Gander, Newfoundland has a crater on Mars named after it. This crater was dedicated to Gander in 1991 because of the town’s history of pioneering aviation and aerospace technologies.
  140. Dildo is a town in Newfoundland.
  141. Ocean Falls, British Columbia is known as ‘Home of the Rain People’. It rains around 330 days a year with an average annual rainfall of 180-200 inches (4500-5000ml).
  142. Calgary, Alberta is one of the sunniest cities in Canada, receiving 2400 hours of sunshine annually.
  143. Calgary is also one of the windiest cities in Canada. It’s famous for its chinook winds which can raise winter temperatures by 20 degrees C (68 degrees F) in a day and melt snow at 2-3cm (1 -1 1/2″) per hour.
  144. Canada is a bilingual country and labels on commercial products must have both English and French information.
  145. Montreal is the second largest French speaking city in the world, right behind Paris, France.
  146. Montreal is often called the City of Saints or City of a Hundred Bell Towers thanks to its many beautiful churches.
  147. There are 6 cities in Canada with population in excess of 1 million – Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver, Calgary, Ottawa-Gatineau, and Edmonton.
  148. The world’s richest deposit of caesium – used as an element in Caesium-based atomic clocks and as a lubricant for large scale drilling – is found at Bernic Lake, Manitoba.
  149. The Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough, Ontario has the world’s largest collection of canoes and kayaks. Peterborough sponsors an annual paddling week.
  150. I AM CANADIAN AND PROUD OF IT.

Talk to you again soon,

Lenie

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31 Comments

  1. Happy Canada Day Lenie.
    Thanks for sharing all those great tidbits about this great country. I feel truly blessed to have been born here. The greatest country on the planet.

    • Hi Wil – so good to hear from you – yeah, rub it in, I’m only Dutch-Canadian, you’re the real thing. LOL – love you anyway 🙂

  2. While we in the U.S. tend to be a little erratic these days, Canada has in fact always been an amiable neighbor. Most of my time in Canada has been in the eastern half but I’ve yet to visit a place in Canada I didn’t enjoy. Happy Canada Day!

    • Thanks Ken – so glad you enjoyed your time here in Canada. I feel we are really fortunate to be living here and for that matter, to have the US as neighbours. I love some of the crossborder sharing, like the Library/Opera House and the Golf Course – that pretty well sums up our relationship. 🙂

  3. Hi Lenie & Happy Canada Day!

    I’m quite certain there are only 2 Cdn territories? Yukon & Nunavut? You will want to correct ur spelling of Nunavut as well. And i’d like to add Churchill, MB to the list of best places to see the Northern lights. Great list though. I learned a lot!

    • Hi Doreen – I will add Churchill, MB to the list. Actually I apologize that I missed that, didn’t you write about that sometime back. Anyway, consider it added. As for the territories, there really are three – Yukon, Nunavut (spelling corrected) and the Northwest Territories. Putting this list together was a lot of fun and like you, I learned a lot too. What an Amazing Country. Happy Canada Day to you.

      • Hi Lenie! I honestly did not know that NWT was still an Official territory! Cheers!

  4. What a great list about Canada and it’s inhabitants. Just one thing… U2 is an Irish band but I totally get what you are saying. Would have preferred someone like Roch Voisine who performed just the other night according to his facebook page. He might have been available.
    Happy Canada Day!

    • Hi Sharon, thanks for the correction – I’ll update my post. But wouldn’t this have been a great opportunity to showcase Canadian talent? Happy Canada Day to you. Have fun and celebrate greatly.

  5. Thank you for sharing a little history about Canada. I have always wanted to visit Niagara Falls which I remember clearly from Superman 2 which the boy falls in. I can imagine it is a major tourist attraction.

    Interesting that there are more over 65’s than under 15’s in Canada. Who will run Canada in 40/50 years time?

    • Phoenicia, I hope you do get the opportunity to visit Canada. It is so different from Europe. When my Dutch grandparents visited in the 60’s they were astonished at the distances they had to travel to get anywhere, the great open spaces, the many trees and the gorgeous scenery, including Niagara Falls.

  6. I’ve only had poutine once, but it is indeed a messy and delicious treat!

    • Jeri, did you know that Tim Horton’s in the States was serving donuts with poutine for our Canada Day? Whoever was in charge thought poutine was our national food – I would think maple syrup would probably hold that title.

  7. From someone who is Australian and has never been to Canada (on the travel list), this was such a great post to read! I love learning quick facts about things. I bet it must have been fun putting it together as well.

    • Hi Emily, you are so right – I had a great time finding out all these facts – so much for the staid and sober Canadians eh? Now you’ll know where to go when you do visit Canada – you could start at the Yukon, see the Northern Lights while drinking the Sour Toe Cocktail. I loved that one. 🙂

  8. Wow! Well done, Lenie! Would personally don’t take the time to find one interesting fact for each year Sweden has existed as a country because that would entail thousands of facts. Would have to write a book, actually.

    • Catarina, knowing some of Sweden’s history, I think a book about Swedish facts – good, bad and downright weird – would be a best-seller. We both have countries to be proud of so it’s good to brag a little. 🙂

  9. I’ve always wanted to visit Canada, I actually got accepted into UBC when I was still deciding where to study for my undergrad, but ended up not going there. I loved reading all the facts about Canada, so much I didn’t know! Thanks for sharing, I shall definitely put Canada on my travel list =)

    • Rosary, I hope you get the opportunity to visit Canada soon and experience some of both the beauty and the odd things about this country. It truly is a unique place. I think you would have enjoyed studying in BC. That’s a beautiful province but then each province has it’s own appeal – all depends on the early people who settled them.

  10. What an awesome post Lenie! I’ve had the pleasure of visiting Canada 4 times, and on each occasion, I traveled with a group of hotel sales managers from Hawaii and we did the coast to coast thing making dozens of stops across the country sharing “aloha spirit” with Canadian travel agents. Yes, the time zone thing is a trip!

    One of my favorite stops was in Quebec and we visited a maple syrup farm (are they called farms?), and after getting off the motor coaches were driven through this amazing forest in horse-drawn coaches and then had lunch at a stunning lodge with a huge stone fireplace. To thank our hosts we put on a show, played Hawaiian music and we all danced the hula. Such special memories. 🙂

    • Marquita, you had a true Canadian experience and I’m so glad you did. I think Maple Syrup Time is the National Activity and is always celebrated in style. Here in my corner of Ontario we have lots of sugar activities happening each year too and it’s always exciting.
      We have four large Maple trees standing guard over our house and when the boys were young my husband used to tap the trees and make maple syrup. It takes a lot of sap – like a five gallon pail – to make a pint of syrup but boy, was it good.
      I enjoyed hearing about you doing your hula show. Wouldn’t this appreciation for each others culture do much to broaden our knowledge and inspire tolerance? Thanks for your story – totally enjoyed it.

  11. Belated Happy Birthday Canada! May you have thousands of glorious years ahead.
    I am sending lots of love for this beautiful and peaceful country from India …

    • Thank you Tuhin – I feel so blessed to live in Canada. We have so much to be thankful for. 🙂

  12. Wow, you put some work into this one. Very happy to be living here, not perfect but we are definitely blessed

    • Hi Lea, you’re right – this was a lot of work but it was also a lot of fun and through it all I kept thinking how great it was to be living here. Very beautiful, a bit quirky, and generally peaceful and safe. 🙂

  13. Well here’s some trivia I didn’t know about Canada. I didn’t know it was only 150 years old. I just assumed it was older. Go figure. I think that is interesting about the Opera House on the Canada/Us border. And I remember it being a big story that all those planes were diverted to that one town in Canada on 911 and how nice everyone there was.

    • Erica, I love the Opera House bit. When I was writing that I was thinking that only about 20 years ago both Canadians and Americans could enter with no hassle and share the audience and visit back and forth which was great for both our countries. Now they have armed Guards at the entrance. Necessary but what a pity.

  14. Reading this, brought back so many memories. I live just across the border in New York.
    I grew up watching the Friendly Giant, and Mr. Dressup, some of the best children’s television ever broadcasted.
    In fact, I became a professional wrestler because of wrestling programs on CBC and CTV.
    My family got the popcorn ready for Hockey Night in Canada.
    Some of the best programs I saw were on there too, like The Beachcombers and Seeing Things. Not to mention being educated by David Suzuki on The Nature of Things.
    Come to think about it, I use to finish my alphabet with Zed.
    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

    • Wow, William, you brought back some great memories for me too, but you also aged me. You remember watching Mr.Dressup, I remember that I took my 2 oldest boys when they were only 2 and 4 yrs. to see Mr. Dressup live – what a great time they had. As for Hockey Night in Canada, I used to get so excited about the Maple Leafs – hate the expanded NHL, really miss the original six. I’m glad that I also brought back some good memories for you.

  15. Four points:
    (1) I was going to point out that, per Fact 27, Churchill, Manitoba is known as “the polar bear capital of the world”, but then again, doesn’t everyone in Canada have a pet polar bear? 🙂
    (2) Here in the States, you’ll find a “Made in Canada” on a box of Quaker Instant Oatmeal next to the ‘best by’ date (at least this is true for the Raisins & Spice variety that I always get).
    (3) Over and above the mouth-watering desserts detailed in Facts 88-91, let me note that Voortman Cookies, whose peanut butter wafers are very good, is based in Canada.
    (4) U2? Was Sarah McLachlan busy or something? Anyway, avid music listener that I am, let me give a shout-out to two somewhat-off-the-beaten-track Canadian musical artists that I find rewarding to listen to:
    (a) Martha and the Muffins
    (b) Jane Siberry

    • Hi Andy. How did an American collect this much Canadian trivia? Very impressive. To respond to your points:
      1. The current economic conditions made it too expensive to feed our polar bear pets. We had to let them all go back to Winnipeg where they have taken up terrorizing the locals.
      2. All the really yummy Quaker Oats products get made in Canada!
      3. I shouldn’t be stealing slogans but Voortmans “make good cookies”
      4. The U2 choice was ludicrous but totally in keeping with decisions made by our non-thinking government. I’ve never heard of Martha and the Muffins or Jane Siberry but will check them out now (my musical taste is actually left over from the 50’s).

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